10 Mind Blowing Facts About Seinfeld

Seinfeld Complete Series Box Set
Seinfeld Complete Series Box Set

Seinfeld, popularly known as the show about nothing, was one of the most mainstream sitcoms ever. Regardless of whether it was the conventionalities of the characters or only the peculiar, yet relatable circumstances they wound up in, Seinfeld just reverberated with people. Though Seinfeld has broadly earned the notoriety of being a “show about nothing,” the thought behind the series—which debuted on July 5, 1989—was not.

Hey guys, welcome back to Watch Tank. Today we are counting down our top 10 top picks of mind-blowing facts about Seinfeld.

10. Female characters

Seinfeld cast on stage
Seinfeld cast on stage

There were been controversies about two female characters in the show. Initially, the main female character was supposed to be Claire, a server at the coffee shop who might offer Jerry and George guidance along with their coffee. “[W]hen we shot the pilot, I was the girl in Seinfeld,” Lee Garlington, the actress who played Claire in the pilot, told HuffPo. “They didn’t pick up my contract.” There are contrasting accounts concerning why this occurred. Jason Alexander said it was because Garlington revised every last bit of her lines. At the same time, Seinfeld affirmed that she did give Larry David modifications. He swears that that is not the reason she was supplanted, saying they required “a character who was a little more involved.”

Elaine’s character wasn’t initially projected. Seinfeld’s first filming of the ‘lady’ role was a cheeky server named Claire played by entertainer Lee Garlington. After the pilot was shot, in any case, the makers felt Garlington was undoubtedly not a solid match and started looking for substitution roles/entertainers. From that point forward, Garlington has had guest appearances on in many famous TV series, including The West Wing, Seventh Heaven, 8 Simple Rules, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Judging Amy, Will and Grace, L.A. Law, The Practice, Quantum Leap, Home Improvement, Boston Legal, Roseanne, Get a Life, Profiler, Medium, and Lie to Me.

9. Clapping refrained on the growing popularity

Actor Jerry Seinfeld
Actor Jerry Seinfeld

Following is information Seinfeld uncovered about Kramer’s life before the show starts: A man in a recreation center exposed himself to Kramer when Kramer was a little boy; he experienced childhood in an exacting family unit where his sleep time each night was 9 PM; he fled from home at 17; he didn’t graduate secondary school yet has a GED; he has an offensive relationship with his mother; he’s the last line of guys in his family (additionally, he’s the only main character who never shows up nearby his/her dad); he has a hard of hearing cousin – and learned ASL from him; he was in the Army. He lived in LA, and he used to be stuck in the head by a falling forced air system while strolling on the walkway, perhaps in Greenwich Village. At the height of the Kramer popularity, the directors of the show needed to ask the individuals from the studio crowd to stop clapping so long because the other cast individuals started to complain.

8. The cast was terrified of an actor

Actor Larry David
Actor Larry David

In the series, Elaine’s father is a prominent creator, Alton Benes. The character depended on Revolutionary Road author Richard Yates, the father of Larry David’s ex, Monica Yates (who honestly intimidated David). In the series, Alton was played by amazing tough guys. However, Lawrence Tierney wasn’t only “a tough guy”. He was insane. Lawrence Tierney got the role since he had a reputation for being a tough guy. All through his acting career, he provoked anybody: regular citizens, cops, and associates. The Simpsons showrunner, Josh Weinstein, said he was the craziest guest star they ever had. Tierney was so disappointed one day while working on the movie, Reservoir Dogs, he raged home, and impacted his shotgun, accidentally starting shooting his nephew. That is the degree of insanity we’re discussing.

Lawrence Tierney played Joe in the season two episode “The Jacket.” Even though it was expected to be a reoccuringrole, Tierney—like his on-screen partner—truly terrified the cast, especially when Seinfeld found that he had stolen a butcher knife from the set, and hit it under his coat. “Lawrence Tierney scared the living crap out of all of us,” while Julia Louis-Dreyfus referred to him as a “nut job.” When Seinfeld spotted Tierney taking a butcher’s knife from the kitchen, they called him out on him before everyone.

Even though Alton was supposed to be a reoccuring character,after working together for that one episode, the cast refused to work with him anymore. However, they admitted Tierney was astounding in the role.

7. Did you know an episode was abandoned?

Actor Jason Alexander
Actor Jason Alexander

There was an episode that was abandoned. It was titled ‘The Bet.’ Even though it might have appeared as though no subject was untouchable for Seinfeld’s creators (remember “The Contest”?), an episode revolves around the ease with which one could purchase a handgun was inevitably dumped. Titled “The Bet,” it was composed for the show’s subsequent season; “We started making it and stopped in the middle and said ‘this doesn’t work. We did the read-through and then canceled it. A lot of other stuff happened, but trying to make that funny ended up being no fun.” Seinfeld mentioned in an interview. The episode was replaced by “The Phone Message.

6. New York in Los Angeles

Actors Michael Richards & Jerry Seinfeld
Actors Michael Richards & Jerry Seinfeld

Jerry’s address is referenced on various occasions in the series as 129 W. 81st road (despite the show’s facade representing it as “757”) — solidly situated in Manhattan’s Upper West Side. This address is a road and a half west of Central Park, and mostly over the street from the Museum of Natural History. Notwithstanding, setting up shots of the outside was that of a structure in Los Angeles. Genuine Jerry claims a structure called The Beresford at 211 Central Park West — about a street or two away from his previous fictional locale. There’s a Taco Bell right opposite it.

Did you know it was actually shot in Los Angeles? Comment down below and let us know.

5. On-screen coffee shop not real after all

Actor Wayne Knight
Actor Wayne Knight

Monk’s, the coffee shop where the characters regularly met each other, was designed to look like the Upper West Side bistro, Tom’s Restaurant, which still exists. Even though its outside normally says just “Restaurant,” it’s claimed that when different sides of the coffee shop are apparent, you can make out “Tom’s Restaurant” on the harder-to-read side. The outside scenes for Monk’s Cafe were taken as shots of Tom’s Restaurant at the intersection of West 112th Street and Broadway in New York City, while the inside shots were recorded on a soundstage. Tom’s Restaurant is a sufficiently bright spot with four huge rectangular windows when seen from the side, yet Monk’s Cafe has two little domed windows with blinds. The number of windows outwardly of the diner don’t coordinate with the quantity of those shown inside. The diner joint, Tom’s Restaurant, is a “classic Greek-American restaurant serving great meals and great food.” Their slogan appears to be “Make it nice!” and whoever did the website didn’t get the reminder that you just put one space (not two) after a period now.

4. Show about nothing

Actor Patrick Warburton
Actor Patrick Warburton

Upon asking the Seinfeld fans to sum up the series, they’ll most likely say, “It’s a show about nothing.” The episode, The Chinese Restaurant, is regularly used to support this point since nothing of outcome occurs. The group hangs tight in a line for 20 minutes. They don’t get into the café in the end. Because the posse never appears to learn from their missteps, they don’t generally create, and therefore nothing significant occurs. The first and last conversation is of George whining to Jerry about a button to emphasize the characters haven’t developed in any capacity in nine years.

As indicated by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, the series was never intended to be “about nothing”. Seinfeld was initially pitched to show how a comedian gets his stand-up material. Although this is underlined in the beginning episodes, the stand-up pieces were eventually eliminated. In Season 4, there is a meta-story where a studio inquiry about whether he is keen on featuring in a show about his life. George discloses to Jerry that the show ought to be about “nothing”, which is how Seinfeld became associated with this idea.

During a 2014 Reddit AMA, Jerry Seinfeld mentioned that both he and co-maker Larry David were surprised by how Seinfeld earned its “show about nothing” moniker: “The pitch for the show, the real pitch, when Larry and I went to NBC in 1988, was we want to show how a comedian gets his material. The show about nothing was just a joke in an episode many years later, and Larry and I, to this day, are surprised that it caught on as a way that people describe the show because it’s the opposite of that.”

3. Newman or Norman?

Actor Wayne Knight Wearing Suit
Actor Wayne Knight Wearing Suit

Newman doesn’t have a first name. The typical theory is that his first name is “Norman,” because in the episode “The Bottle Deposit, Part 2, “season 7, episode 2, the rancher’s girl yells, “Farewell, Norman!” This was the actress’ slip-up — she mixed up “Newman” for “Norman” in the script. Seinfeld’s makers found the slip-up interesting, so they kept the error. Newman is somewhere officially considered “Newman” when he goes to court, and the appointed authority alludes to him as Mr. Newman. In the episode “The Package” (season 8, ep. 5), his business card is shown — it reads merely ‘Newman.’

Newman showed up in the seventh episode of the subsequent season. However, the role was just voice and was portrayed by series co-creator Larry David. Newman previously showed up in the physical form in the episode “The Suicide,” which broadcasts as the fifteenth episode of the third season.

Did you notice this slip of tongue or did you confuse yourself with the name? Let us know in the comments below.

2. Great show deserves greater appreciation

Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award

With extraordinary popularity comes incredible fandom, and Seinfeld has a considerable number of committed fans who need to know every part of the show. Ideally, those given fans can discover something they didn’t know about on this list.

Seinfeld was continually a ratings winner and won a mind-boggling three Golden Globes, 10 Primetime Emmys, and four People’s Choice Awards during its run.

Indeed, Seinfeld was so famous that an expected 76.3 million views — or 58 percent of all U.S. watchers — tuned in for the show’s finale, making it the fourth most-watched finale in the history of U.S. TV, following M*A*S*H, Cheers, and The Fugitive.

Here are some honourable mentions before we take you to our top 1 pick.

  • The puffy shirt used in “The Puffy Shirt” episode is currently placed in the Smithsonian.
  • Kramer’s famous “I’m out of the contest!” moment, was his 100th entrance into Jerry’s apartment.
  • Frank Sinatra died while the series finale was being aired.
  • Jerry Seinfeld turned down a proposal from NBC that would have made him $110 million for the 10th season.
  • “No, hugging, no learning” was brought out by Larry David. He made sure that the cast and crew were aware of his. It meant that they should avoid any sentimentality or situations that would force the characters to change or grow. “A lot of people don’t understand that Seinfeld is a dark show. If you examine the premises, terrible things happen to people. They lose jobs; somebody breaks up with a stroke victim; somebody’s told they need a nose job. That’s my sensibility,” David explained.

1. End is the new beginning

Seinfeld DVD
Seinfeld DVD

Following the repetitive tendency of individual episodes in the series, Seinfeld started and ended discussing a shirt button. The last discussion, between George and Jerry, is a replica of the one that began the series . In the first episode, George and Jerry are discussing a button. Towards the end of the last episode, while sitting in a prison cell, they have a similar discussion about a button:” See, now to me, that button is in the worst possible spot. The second button makes or breaks the shirt. Look at it; it’s too high, it’s in no man’s land.”

Seinfeld ran for more than a decade, but its relevance is intact until now. What do you think about the show? Have you watched the series yet? Comment down below and let us know.

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